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Author: VernonEmeks   May 23, 2020 at 14:18:17  from 89.248.174.39   in reply to: unnebulous foxiest posted by zpolet417 on August 26, 2016 at 03:25:42

Families witness homecoming of crash victims

The family of a teenage boy killed in a car crash Tuesday are thanking community members for their cooperation.

Joshua S. Gettert, 17, of San Francisco was killed when his 2014 Toyota Camry collided with a vehicle headed north on Alameda Road at about 5:45 p.m. Tuesday near Broadway and Alameda Avenue, San Francisco police said.

Family and friends of Gettert gathered Wednesday at the funeral home, which is located a block away from where the teen was killed.

Friends have been helping fund the funeral through donations and donations at the San Francisco Cemetery and Chapel, said Kathy Visser, spokesman for Alameda Cemetery's board of directors.

"It's hard, and we understand that, but it's the right thing to do," she said. "We don't have much money to spend and this is something that we believe the community supports."

Family and friends of Joshua Gettert, 17, gather in front of the funeral home in San Francisco, Calif., Tuesday, March 9, 2017. A family friend has given away 10,000 dollars to pay for Joshua's funeral and services. (Maura Serna/ The Chronicle) The family and friends of Joshua Gettert, 17, gather in front of the funeral home in San Francisco, Calif., Tuesday, March 9, 2017. A family friend has given away 10,000 dollars to pay for Joshua's funeral and services. (Maura Serna/ The Chronicle)

Joshua's mother, Angela Gettert, speaks with her daughter, mother-in-law Julie Gettert, at the funeral home in San Francisco, Calif., Tuesday, March 9, 2017. Joshua's mother, Angela Gettert, speaks with her daughter, mother-in-law Julie Gettert, at the funeral home in San Francisco, Calif., Tuesday, March 9, 2017. (Maura Serna/ The Chronicle) Joshua's mother, Angela Gettert, speaks with her daughter, mother-in-law Julie Gettert, at the funeral home in San Francisco, Calif., Tuesday, March 9, 2017. Joshua's mother, Angela Gettert, speaks with her daughter, mother-in-law Julie Gettert, at the funeral home in San Francisco, Calif., Tuesday, March 9, 2017. (Maura Serna/ The Chronicle) (Maura Serna/ The Chronicle)

In memory of Joshua Gettert, 17. Friends and family also are paying their respects at the San Francisco Cemetery and Chapel where a burial was also held this week. Joshua was the brother of a boy who died in the crash. Friends also were paying their respects at th
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Resources sector falls dent australian share market shares

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Global manufacturing companies may soon get their biggest chance of saving themselves a buck from a federal government tax regime they call a "cromnibus."

Australian manufacturing and manufacturing services are booming, and Australia's share of the world economy has grown from less than 0.1% in 2000 to nearly 10% now.

But there's growing concern a new federal government tax regime for services will further dent the industry.

That sector includes financial services, which account for 5.3% of the global economy and account for 10% of its total exports.

The Reserve Bank and other experts recommend to the government that manufacturing sector businesses should pay no more than the GST - about $0.50.

Finance Minister Mathias Cormann says it will likely bring down companies' tax bills by about $9 million for the 2013-2014 financial year.

Finance is seen as the sector with the most immediate impact from the changes, with companies, and even government, facing higher tax bills.

The Federal Government has long resisted taking any steps to change tax rates on financial services companies.

In 2013-2014, the Finance Department published a consultation paper saying that GST rates could not be changed without "an absolute change in the economic regime".

Finance also has previously declined to take any steps to change the GST for the services sector on the basis that it was being regulated by the GST Council - which also regulates consumer protection.

Industry groups counter that any change in GST rates for services companies would affect all business interests - not just those of financial services companies.

For example, the industry groups say the increase in the GST rates could impact companies that produce software, computer software, software services and data management.

Mr Cormann says industry will need to come to agreement on which services companies should bear the brunt of GST hikes.

He says the decision to seek unanimous agreement will be made by the Senate committee, which is not expected to issue its report until early next year.

Topics: mining-industry, budget, australia

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